Melting Glaciers and Changing Landscapes

sotm coverThe Athabasca Glacier has receded more than 1.5 kilometres and lost half its volume in the past 125 years. But what’s the story for the rest of the alpine environment in Western Canada? Check out my report published by the Alpine Club of Canada, which combines the voices of both scientists and mountaineers. It was published back in 2011, but the content is no less relevant.

The results in the report are downright unnerving. Comparative photographs reveal a quickly changing landscape. Anecdotes speak to increased rock fall and objective hazards for mountaineers. Scientists speak to a lack of funding, and other factors inhibiting their research on climate change. And while not all is lost, the report calls those who love the mountains into action and encourages us to think seriously about how our behaviour today influences the landscape of the future.

→ Read The State of the Mountains Report

 

New Publication: Roughing It…Sorta

Parks Canada oTENTikLast summer I had the opportunity to check out Parks Canada’s new oTENTiks at Two Jack Lake in Banff National Park with my husband and 5-month old. As part of an assignment for Avenue Calgary, we spent the night in one of these A-frame cabins and enjoyed an absolute downpour and thunderstorm (and rainbow to follow!) from the comfort of a shelter. My article includes information about both the oTENTiks and Alpine Club of Canada hut system.

Read Roughing It…Sorta in the June issue of Avenue Magazine

Historic Plaque for Alpine Club of Canada’s Abbot Pass Hut

As a proud member of the Alpine Club of Canada, and also a member of their national Mountain Culture Committee, I volunteered to write this historic plaque to be placed at the Abbot Pass Hut. This stone hut, built in 1922 at a col high above Lake Louise, offers a cozy stay for mountaineers en route to Mts. Victoria and Lefroy. Finally, mountaineers (and adventurous hikers) will be given an opportunity to read up on the history of the shelter, and gain a greater appreciation for how it has served climbers in the past.

climArt change: Film . Art . Words .

Thursday, February 23, the North Columbia Environmental Society presents climArt change, a multi-media show that celebrates the possibilities in the face of climate change.

As the author of the Alpine Club of Canada’s “State of the Mountains Report,” I’ll be giving a short keynote address to kick off the evening.  This talk will introduce the theme of the evening, in addition to highlighting the importance of local knowledge – what we learn from people who have the experience and observations gained from intimate experiences in the wild places.

Other special guests include Greg Hill (he has one inspiring project to share with you), Trapper Snowboards (recreational locovores), and much more…

If you’re in the area, come on out for some art, short films, inspiring words, funky music, drinks, door prizes and a great crowd!